The Asus Airvision M1 Glasses Offer Large Virtual Screens

ASUS seems to have surprised people by announcing its AirVision M1 glasses, with some considering them an alternative to Apple’s Vision Pro headset. But I discovered that ASUS’ glasses are much more a new Alternative to portable monitors than something intended for space computing.

The big difference between the AirVision M1 glasses and something like the Vision Pro or even the Air 2 Ultras from Xreal is that they don’t support truly interactive AR. Of course, the glasses can project your desktop or several windows into space, but they must be connected to a nearby device and do not detect any hand gestures or other virtual objects.

Instead, I found that the main goal is to give you extra screen space without having to carry large, bulky portable monitors. With integrated MicroLED screens with Full HD resolution, the AirVisions can display up to six or seven windows or virtual desktops. You can also choose between

en A handful of proportions (16:9, 21:9, 32:9 and more), with the three degrees of freedom glasses that allow you to either pin these screens in the virtual space or to follow your head as you move.

Instead, I found that the main goal is to give you extra screen space without having to carry large, bulky portable monitors. With integrated MicroLED screens with Full HD resolution, the AirVisions can display up to six or seven windows or virtual desktops. You can also choose between a handful of aspect ratios(16:9, 21:9, 32:9 and more), with the three degrees of freedom glasses that allow you to either pin these screens in the virtual space or to follow your head as you move.

Instead, I found that the main goal is to give you extra screen space without having to carry large, bulky portable monitors. With integrated MicroLED screens with Full HD resolution, the AirVisions can display up to six or seven windows or virtual desktops. You can also choose between a handful of aspect ratios(16:9, 21:9, 32:9 and more), with the three degrees of freedom glasses that allow you to either pin these screens in the virtual space or to follow your head as you move. Instead, I found that the main goal is to give you extra screen space without having to carry large, bulky portable monitors. With integrated MicroLED screens with Full HD resolution, the AirVisions can display up to six or seven windows or virtual desktops. You can also choose between a handful of aspect ratios(16:9, 21:9, 32:9 and more), with the three degrees of freedom glasses that allow you to either pin these screens in the virtual space or to follow your head as you move.

ASUS AirVision M1 glasses

Practical photos of the ASUS AirVision M1 glasses from CES.

During my first demonstration, I used the AirVision M1s while it was connected to a laptop in which it behaved almost exactly as if it had a somewhat floating desktop that seemed to float six feet in front of me. At first, the virtual screens were a little blurry, but after a brief period of acclimatization and some time composing my IPD (eye relief), I was pleasantly surprised to see how sharp everything was. Compared to something like Sighted Spacetop, presented as the world’s first AR laptop, it not only had a much larger vertical field of view (up to 57 degrees), but did not require any additional specialized equipment, since the glasses are essentially plug-and-play. Although I didn’t need it, it’s important to note that the glasses come with a pair of nose pads to make sure you get a good fit, as well as a prescription insert for those who have glasses.

Once configured, it was quite easy to create additional virtual workspaces. All I had to do was call up a small command menu, press a plus sign where a new window should appear, and that’s it. You can also freely adjust the overall size of the virtual display by zooming in or out. And one of the best things about the AirVisions is that it was not at all difficult to use the laptop’s touchpad or type. Because they can see through the virtual screens, I just looked down and focused my eyes where they needed to go. This means that if you are distracted by something in the background, ASUS’ glasses are also equipped with magnetic blinds that attach to the front for a clean black background.

However, my favorite use matter was when I tried another pair of AirVisions connected to a ROG Ally, where the glasses provided me with a giant virtual screen to play on. In this way, it is similar to wearing a headset like the Meta Quest 3, but for non-VR games. This is the kind of device I would like to have on a plane where space is limited, especially for something like a portable monitor. That said, I’m not sure I can handle the embarrassment of being a modern glass hole, at least not until devices like this become a little more popular.

So, if you are looking for an Alternative to the travel monitor, keep an eye out for the AIRVISION M1 glasses from ASUS when they become available in the 3rd quarter of this year.

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